• Link

    At the Guardian “‘Messy attics of the mind’: what’s inside a writer’s notebook?”

    Notebooks aka ‘Messy attics of the mind’ I’m living for this article at The Guardian by Susie Boyt about the notebooks of writers. I have to admit, I use the notes feature of my phone and iPad far more than I use an actual pen and paper. I was tired of scribbling down ideas and then immediately losing them. Now, I can just go through my notes and try to figure out what I was trying to remember when I wrote: “what if vampires are real?” and “holy hell destroyed the fiery feel.” Messy attics of the mind’: what’s inside a writer’s notebook?

  • Link

    Jane Austen knew what was up

    In depressing news, this article at the Guardian goes into the  decline of women characters and writers. Academics from the universities of Illinois and California at Berkeley used an algorithm to examine 104,000 works of fiction dating from 1780 to 2007, drawn mostly from HathiTrust Digital Library. The algorithm identified both author and character genders. The academics expected to see an increase in the prominence of female characters in literature across the two centuries. Instead, “from the 19th century through the early 1960s we see a story of steady decline,” write Ted Underwood, David Bamman and Sabrina Lee in their paper The Transformation of Gender in English-Language Fiction, which has just…

  • Link

    Literary Hub takes you on a tour to 35 literary bars and cafes from around the world

    Emily Temple, over at Literary Hub, takes readers on a tour of 35 different bars and cafes where libations were sipped by writers and literary luminaries. I personally am not a fan of writing anywhere other than my desk. I’ve tried working in coffee shops, but I just can’t relax – let alone write. I feel exposed, like a deer eating its way through a prize-winning garden right in front of the owner’s sliding glass door. I’m going to be spotted any moment! Of course, the people on this list weren’t actually writing in these cafes. They were drinking and procrastinating, something I that I have done in a cafe. So me and…

  • Link

    The Paris Review Explores Selika, Mystery of the Belle Epoque

    In a short piece over at the Paris Review, Susanna Forrest attempts to discover who Selika was. Working with nothing more than six pictures which turned up on Tumblr in 2012, Susanna tries to find something, anything about this enigmatic, tragic figure. This much I do know: she was a black amazone in Belle Epoque Paris, a city where black “Amazons” were shown in a human zoo; she was a celebrity who left no other trace than these six tokens of her celebrity; she was a horsewoman without a horse, a power hinted at but not granted. The whole thing is well worth a read.